The opinions of sigmund freud on the relation between the rise of civilization law enforcement and t

By repressing their natural urges, humans are civilized, but live in a continual state of discontent. To repress these naturally occurring human instincts and create an orderly society, humans have turned to civilization. In his estimation, religion provides for defense against "the crushingly superior force of nature" and "the urge to rectify the shortcomings of civilization which made themselves painfully felt".

But in doing so, humans have also created the source of their unhappiness; they are no longer allowed to act in a manner that is instinctually natural. But there are two sources of guilt: The Nazis and their absolute destruction of the Jews, their brutal conquest and occupation of most of Europe, and their eventual downfall all appear to have be explained….

First was the establishment of Christianity over paganism and the focus Christianity places on the afterlife instead of earthly life.

Sigmund Freud Civilization and Its Discontents&nbspEssay

Nothing is said about High Schools, where it is well known that it must have started up at some time around the seventeenth century, or around there somewhere anyway. Thus our possibilities for happiness are restricted by the law.

World War I undoubtedly influenced Freud and his central observation about the tension between the individual and civilization. It is no wonder then, that this repression could lead to discontent among civilians. In his analysis of civilization and why so many of its members are unhappy, Freud begins with what many consider a feeling of happiness, what he calls the "oceanic" feeling many associate with religious faith.

Art is an illusion of some sort and a long story. Authority is what controls society and it uses the super-ego to help individuals develop a sense of self-control. In order to control the more dangerous tendencies, man has developed what Freud calls the "super-ego," or in common speech, the conscience.

In a nation still recovering from a particularly brutal war, Freud developed thoughts published two years earlier in The Future of an Illusionwherein he criticized organized religion as a collective neurosis.

Yet at the same time, organized religion exacts an enormous psychological cost on the individual by making him or her perpetually subordinate to the primal father figure embodied by God.

This process, argues Freud, is an inherent quality of civilization that gives rise to perpetual feelings of discontent among its citizens. All individuals must submit themselves to forming these feelings of guilt, for their aggressive instincts must be repressed if they hope to share in the love which civilized society has appropriated for its members.

As a result, civilization creates laws that prohibit killing, rape, and adultery, and it implements severe punishments if these rules are broken. And while the love instinct eros can be commandeered by society to bind its members together, the aggressive instinct runs counter to this tendency and must either be repressed or be directed against a rival culture.

In other words, civilization restricts people from doing what they have a natural inclination to do. But his requires individuals to sublimate their personal desires to the needs of the community in general. The third chapter of the book addresses a fundamental paradox of civilization: Thus, Freud acknowledges there is irrevocable ill-will within the hearts of man, and that civilization primarily exists to curb and restrain these impulses.

Freud draws a key analogy between the development of civilization and libidinal development in the individual, which allows Freud to speak of civilization in his own terms: People become neurotic because they cannot tolerate the frustration which society imposes in the service of its cultural ideals.

Overview[ edit ] In this book, Sigmund Freud enumerates what he sees as the fundamental tensions between civilization and the individual. These aggressive energies develop into the super-ego as conscience, which punishes the ego both for transgressions committed remorse but also for sins it has only fantasized about guilt.

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People have a natural tendency to engage in unrestricted sexual activity, but civilization places restrictions upon those activities; mostly in the form of monogamous relationships. In the sixth chapter, Freud reviews the development of his concept of libido to explain why it must now be separated into two distinct instincts: Ironically, just a few years after its publication, Adolph Hitler was elected Chancellor of Germany and many of the assertions made by Freud seemed to be proved correct.

In this Freudian summary there is nothing that is heard about the dialects of leaders, nor of multitudes, nor disciplines that are rarely heard of outside of Ivy League institutions, which always seem to think that science is supposed to have Aristotle in it. Instead of allowing people to exist in a less developed state of natural inclinations, civilization has imposed unnatural restrictions upon the natural behavior of humans in exchange for a sense of security from the dangers of the world.

It gave them an advantage in all activities that involved making an abstract model of experience, in words or numbers or lines, and working with the abstraction to achieve control over nature or to bring humane order to life.

But when individuals submit to the authority of society there is a conflict between the desires of the individual and the needs of society. And finally, the scientific breakthroughs which have identified the mechanism of neuroses caused by social demands. Second came the European discovery and conquest of primitive peoples around the globe who seemed to be living in happiness due to their closeness to nature.

Then he harks back to the mnemic image.The Opinions of Sigmund Freud on the Relation between the Rise of Civilization, Law Enforcement, and the Discontent of the People in a Society ( words, 3 pages) According to Sigmund Freud, the process of civilization in any society gives rise to feelings of discontent for the people in.

Sigmund Freud's views on religion are described in several of his books and essays.

Sigmund Freud's views on religion

Freud regarded God as an illusion, based on the infantile need for a powerful father figure; religion, necessary to help us restrain violent impulses earlier in the development of civilization, can now be.

Thus our possibilities for happiness are restricted by the law. This process, argues Freud, is an inherent quality of civilization that gives rise to perpetual feelings of discontent among its citizens.

Freud's theory is based on the notion that humans have certain characteristic instincts that are Author: Sigmund Freud. Essay Sigmund Freud Civilization and Its Discontents and 90,+ more term papers written by professionals and your peers.

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He believed that democracy in America was imposition on all by force of public opinion, and even by force of law, of the views and values of the majority. But what if they majority is wrong, unjust, or vulgar in its views?

Sigmund Freud- Freud does not believe in religion and thinks that if we are. The Opinions of Sigmund Freud on the Relation between the Rise of Civilization, Law Enforcement, and the Discontent of the People in a Society.

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The opinions of sigmund freud on the relation between the rise of civilization law enforcement and t
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